Palomar Globular Clusters  
  Last Updated: 10/4/2016  
   
  Number   Ct: Date: Image: Location:   RA DEC   Con: Size: Mag:   Alt Name:  
                                 
  Pal-01-GC   1 20160413 Image Tempe   03 33 23.0 +79 34 50   Cep 1.8' 13.6      
  Pal-02-GC   1 20161003 Image Tempe   04 46 05.9 +31 22 51   Aur 1.9'        
  Pal-03-GC   1 20160326 Image Tempe   10 05 31.0 +00 04 17   Sex 2.8' 13.9   Sextans C  
  Pal-04-GC   1 20160326 Image Tempe   11 29 16.8 +28 58 25   UMa 2.1' 14.2   Ursa Major Dwarf  
  Pal-05-GC   1 20160417 Image Tempe   15 16 05.3 -00 06 41   Ser 6.9' 11.8      
  Pal-06-GC   1 20160707 Image Tempe   17 43 42.2 -26 13 21   Oph 1.2' 11.6      
  Pal-07-GC   1 20160706 Image Tempe   18 10 44.3 -07 12 27   Ser 7.1' 10.3   IC-1276  
x Pal-08-GC   1 20160707 Image Tempe   18 41 29.9 -19 49 33   Sgr 4.7' 11.2      
  Pal-09-GC   1 20160706 Image Tempe   18 55 06.2 -22 42 01   Sgr 3.9' 9.2   NGC-6717  
  Pal-10-GC   1 20160706 Image Tempe   19 18 02.1 +18 34 18   Sge 3.5' 13.2      
  Pal-11-GC   1 20160707 Image Tempe   19 45 14.4 -08 00 26   Aql 3.2' 9.8      
  Pal-12-GC   1 20160812 Image Tempe   21 46 38.8 -21 15 03   Cap 2.9' 11.7   Capricorn Dwarf  
  Pal-13-GC   1 20160707 Image Tempe   23 06 44.5 +12 46 19   Peg 1.8' 14.5      
  Pal-14-GC   1 20160413 Image Tempe   16 11 00.3  +14 57 34   Her 2.1' 14.7      
  Pal-15-GC   1 20160526 Image Tempe   16 59 51.0 -00 32 31   Oph 3.0' 14.2      
   
  What are the Palomar Globular Clusters ?  
   
  From the Deepsky Visuell.de web site:     http://www.deepsky-visuell.de/Projekte/PalomarGC_E.htm  
   
  The catalog of the Palomar globular star clusters (GC) includes 15 members of all together very faint globular star cluster. Except  Palomar 9 (NGC 6717) and Palomar 7 (IC 1276) all these clusters were discovered and classified very late on plates of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS) between 1949-1959. Except its usually very faint brightness and its observing challenge these globular star clusters do not have many thing in common. Most different age, sizes and distances do not let these GC's divide clearly into an obvious scheme.  
   
  From the EVAC Observing Programs web site:   http://evaconline.org/obspgm-palomars.html  
   
  The Palomar globular clusters were discovered in the 1950s on the survey plates of the first Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS). The list of astronomers who first identified the objects as globular clusters includes some famous names, among them Edwin Hubble, Walter Baade, Fritz Zwicky, Halton Arp and George Abell. Several of the Palomar globulars--including Palomar 6, Palomar 7, Palomar 9, Palomar 10 and Palomar 11--are nearby clusters of average size that just happen to be heavily obscured by dust in our line of sight. Others--including Palomar 3, Palomar 4, and Palomar 14 --are giant globulars that are very far away in the extreme outer halo of the Milky Way. Although the objects vary greatly in degree of difficulty--from easy to nearly impossible--observing the whole list is a very challenging observing project for owners of big telescopes.